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Logitech Harmony Remote

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Harmony 670, an activity-based universal remote
Harmony 670, an activity-based universal remote

Logitech Harmony Remote is a line of universal remote controls manufactured and sold by Logitech.

Contents

History

The Harmony remote control was originally created in 2001 by Easy Zapper, a Canadian company, and first sold in November 2001.[1] The company later changed its name to Intrigue Technologies and was located in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Computer peripheral manufacturer Logitech acquired it in May 2004 for US$29 million.[2]

Features

All Harmony remotes are setup online and sync the remote settings from the USB port.

Each remote has IR learning capability, so that the device database of Harmony will always up-to-date. Currently there are 5000+ brands of devices supported.

All Harmony remotes supports one-touch activity based control, which allows to control multiple devices at once.

For example, if one has a TV and a digital set top box in living. By pressing 'Watch TV' activity button on the remote, it will turn on the TV, turn on digital set top box and switch the input of TV to watch digital set top box.

Harmony Remote software

The remote software allows users to update the remote configuration, learn IR commands, and upgrade the remote control's firmware.

Early versions of the remote software were browser based only. Newer versions are Java based, but the software still requires constant internet connectivity to work, as remote control codes are actually downloaded on demand from Logitech, allowing updates to product database and to remote codes and sequences to be easily distributed. This also allows Logitech to survey their market in order to determine products for investigation and research. The Harmony control software is compatible with Windows and Mac OS X. A group of developers are currently working on Harmony Remote software for the Linux platform.[3][4]

www.myharmony.com has launched at March 31, 2010, which currently only support Harmony 300.

Products in production

Harmony 300 (US: April 2010)

The universal remote has 1 activity support (Watch TV), and control up to 4 devices. The remote supports customizes key with remote features and favorite channels. This remote has no LCD and battery recharge.[5]

Harmony 600

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Harmony 650

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Harmony 700

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Harmony One (US: Jan 2008)

The Harmony One features a color touch screen and is rechargeable. It does not offer any RF capability. A CNET TV review stated that it is one of the best universal remotes on the market today.[6]

Harmony 900

Harmony 900 has the same ergonomics design as Harmony One. It has additional four color buttons compared to Harmony One and RF supported. The RF technology used by Harmony 900 is not comparable with Harmony 890, 1000, and 1100.

Harmony 1100 (US: Feb 2009)

Adds QVGA resolution to the touch screen and allows 15 devices to be controlled. [7] The user interface of the Harmony 1100 is now Flash based vs the Java based one found in the Harmony 1000.

Harmony Accessories

E-R0001

The Harmony E-R0001 is an IR to Bluetooth adapter for the PS3.

RF Wireless Extender

The Harmony RF Wireless Extender allows some Harmony remotes, e.g., models 890, 1000 and 1100, to pilot devices using radio frequencies instead of infrared. It allows to pilot devices from farther distances and through some obstacles. The Harmony 1000 is limited to two RF Extenders, while the 1100 can use multiple extenders.

IR Extender System (US: Oct 2009)

The Harmony IR Extender System has a IR blaster and a set of mini blasters. It doesn’t require any programming.

Discontinued Products

Harmony for Xbox 360

The Harmony 360 is pre-configured to be used with the Xbox 360 console, and has special buttons, X, Y, A, B and media center control, correlating with the same as found on native Xbox controllers. It has a back-lit LCD screen and uses four AAA batteries.[8]

Harmony 510/515

The Harmony 510/515 is an entry-level remote that is essentially a replacement to the 500 series and the Xbox 360 version. It features colored buttons typical on most satellite boxes. It has a four-button, monochrome LCD display. This remote is limited to controlling up to five devices.[9]

Harmony 520/525, 550/555

The Harmony 520 and 550 is a mid-range remote that is similar in functionality to the Harmony 659 and 670, but with a different button arrangement and a squared-off physical design compared to the hourglass design of the 6xx series. It has a back-lit monochrome LCD screen. Compared to the model 520, 550 has two extra buttons, is made of higher grade materials and has a different back-light color. Additionally, the model 555 has an infrared learning port; one simply points the original remote control at the Harmony's learning port and it copies the codes of the former.[10]

Harmony 610

The Harmony 610 is functionally identical to the Harmony 670 and Harmony 620, but comes in black with a silver face panel. The 610 can control a maximum of 5 devices.

Harmony 620

The Harmony 620 is functionally identical to the Harmony 670, but comes in black instead of silver/black. The 670 can control up to 15 devices, where the 620 can only control 12 devices.

Harmony 659

Image:Harmony 659.jpg
Harmony 659, an activity-based universal remote

The Harmony 659 is another mid-range universal remote that offers most of the functionality in the Harmony line. It has a monochrome LCD screen.

[11]Template:-

Harmony 670

The Harmony 670 is a mid-range universal remote that offers most of the functionality in the Harmony line. The 670 has a monochrome LCD screen and puts DVR functions in the middle of the remote.[12]

Harmony 688

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Harmony 720

The Harmony 720 was initially offered exclusively through Costco[13] in 2006 and featured a color screen and backlit keys. It was designed as an inexpensive competitor to the earlier Harmony 880, with few differences, except for the ergonomic design and key layout.[13] It is now available through other vendors,[14] but remains unlisted on Logitech's product page.[15]

Harmony 880/885

The Harmony 880 was the first Harmony with a color LCD screen and a rechargeable battery. The Harmony 885 remote has extra buttons as mentioned below. The 885 replaces up and down keys with four color keys used for Teletext and, more recently, by some set-top boxes.

There was a short-lived 880Pro that had the picture and sound buttons. This remote did not feature multi-room/multi-controller support like the 890Pro.

Harmony 890/895

The Harmony 890/895 is the same as the 880/885, but it adds radio frequency (RF) capability, enabling the remote to control devices even without line-of-sight to and from different rooms, up to a range of 30 meters. This remote control cannot control proprietary RF devices, but it can control special Z-Wave RF devices, as well as IR devices without line-of-sight via the RF extender.[16] [17]

The 890Pro adds multi-room and multi-controller support, as well as a different color scheme. (Primary and secondary remotes can be set up that work with the same wireless extender) It also adds two buttons — picture and sound — that allow for quick access to picture- and sound-related commands. It is not listed on the Logitech Web site and is sold through custom installation companies. The 890Pro is not shippped with the RF extender.

Harmony 1000

The Harmony 1000 has customizable touch screen commands, sounds and a rechargeable battery, and allows control up to 15 devices. It is also compatible with the RF extender. A maximum of two extenders can be configured within the software.


References

  1. New Harmony Universal Remote Links Home Entertainment to the Internet. Easy Zapper, Inc. September 27, 2001. Accessed 2007-09-05.
  2. Logitech Acquires Intrigue Technologies, Maker of Acclaimed Harmony Remote Controls. Logitech. May 5, 2004. Accessed 2007-09-05.
  3. Concordance Project
  4. Congruity Project
  5. http://reviews.cnet.com/remote-controls/logitech-harmony-300/4505-7900_7-34058854.html
  6. Logitech Harmony One Reviews
  7. http://www.hemagazine.com/node/logitech_harmony_1100_remote_control
  8. Harmony 360
  9. Harmony 510
  10. Harmony® 555 Advanced Universal Remote official page
  11. Harmony 659
  12. Harmony 670
  13. 13.0 13.1 CNet Harmony 720 Review accessed 09 October 2008
  14. Amazon.com accessed 09 October 2008
  15. Logitech Universal Remotes accessed 09 October 2008
  16. Logitech Harmony 895 Advanced Universal Remote
  17. Logitech Harmony 890 Advanced Universal Remote


External links